decision making

Trust Starts with You

Empowered Learner

Trust starts with you – Stuart’s Statements

Trust is a behaviour that I am passionate about in the workplace.

There have been numerous circumstances where I have offered my trust to others, and equally, not to others.

Most of the time this decision has been based on gut feel, no scientific approach behind my decision and most of the time my decision has been justified.

Not always though.

One thing I have recently consider when thinking more logically about offering trust, is that it starts with yourself.

There are times when people, including myself set new years resolutions.

I did it this year.

I decided to reduce sweet foods.

So far I’ve done fairly well and I’ve managed to avoid sweet foods as a way of creating healthy eating habits.

I didn’t set myself a task which I knew I wouldn’t be able to maintain – for example, I didn’t commit to running six miles four time per week.

I knew I wouldn’t be able to achieve this with on-going work commitments.

Although realistic I wouldn’t trust myself to this level of commitment.

So, before I can trust others, I need to trust myself and my own judgement.

There was a phrase from a TV programme called ‘The Hustle’ – ‘You can’t con an honest person’.

I understand this thought process and believe it to be the same as trust.

If I can trust myself and then surely, I will demonstrate behaviours where I become trustworthy.

The recent news article of Fiona Onasanya, the Peterborough MP was thrown out of the Labour Party after being convicted of perverting the course of justice.

Her position becomes one of distrusting of others where the fundamental questions is can she trust herself?

The longer prejudice of her own judgement will be questioned for some time I would believe.

In a different circumstance, I recently receive a football fine of £20 for a late match report submission.

This was extremely disappointing as I had never missed a deadline on twelve years.

I could challenge but, in this instance, it was my error, nobody else was to blame.

I was wasn’t under pressure elsewhere to place the blame of give an excuse.

In this example, I’ve confessed the error being mine and have excepted the punishment.

I think this approach, even in the workplace of ownership and accountability builds trustworthiness in others but importantly yourself.

And trusting yourself, your own judgement and taking responsibility of errors has a wider benefit for those that are around you.

Have you witnessed a recent event where yourself and/or others hadn’t taken accountability for their actions and have you witnessed the speed of recovery when you/they have?

This forms the foundation of building trust which must start with yourself to commence with.

Share:

Facebook
LinkedIn
read on

Related Posts

ideas for life

Ideas for life – no more resolutions

Why most of us fail? If you are in the incredible 20% of people who hit their resolutions every year, congratulations! You are a rare breed 🙌🥳👏 For the rest of us, it is mostly a journey downwards into a spiral of failure, guilt, and frustration which circles back to thinking less of ourselves and hardly ever making us feel good or achieve anything meaningful. Most of us fail for three main reasons: Lack of clarity, Unreasonable expectations, and Lack of inspiration or passion.

employee wellbeing

Employee Wellbeing

The link between employee wellbeing and productivity is well established but, as we move into the post-pandemic phase, it will be harder than ever for managers to keep the two in harmony.

Stress management strategies using EI

Stress management strategies using EI

Have authentic, emotionally intelligent relationships with people. Associate with those whose company you enjoy and who support you. Authenticity requires self-awareness and emotional expression so that when in conversation with an individual you are able to share your feelings openly, including any distractions impairing your ability to concentrate on them.

stress factors

Stress factors and coping techniques

How can we avoid distress?

We cannot. However, we can learn techniques to keep distress to a minimum by increasing our coping strategies. We can also use eustress appropriately in our occupations to improve our performance and inspire others.

Browse our courses
cmi logo
OTHM Qualifications Logo

High impact, virtual micro-learning for maximum output. All programmes are £100 and can be toped up to a full CMI Level 5 Qualification.

For all levels of managers, fully accredited qualifications to supercharge careers and earning power.

Aimed at leaders managing projects, although the qualification is also open to learners wishing to build on their general management skills.

For all types of consultants, either wishing to enter the field or already working and looking to develop into strategic roles.

For all types of leaders looking to develop their leadership and communications skills, and nurture and build effective and functional teams. 

Browse our courses

High impact, virtual micro-learning for maximum output. All programmes are £100 and can be toped up to a full CMI Level 5 Qualification.

For all levels of managers, fully accredited qualifications to supercharge careers and earning power.

Aimed at leaders managing projects, although the qualification is also open to learners wishing to build on their general management skills.

For all types of consultants, either wishing to enter the field or already working and looking to develop into strategic roles.

For all types of leaders looking to develop their leadership and communications skills, and nurture and build effective and functional teams.